Top Stories from KPC Media

In response to Monday’s report about the financial health of Social Security and Medicare, Indiana Republican Sen. Dan Coats said more needs to be done to ensure their long-term viability.
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The list of marriage licenses in Monday’s edition of The News Sun contained two reporter’s errors.
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A friendship between Kendallville and Levone, Italy, a small village in the foothills of the Italian Alps, began in the summer of 2011 when Levone’s mayor and citizens welcomed representatives from Ke
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SHIPSHEWANA — Hundreds of items are set to go across the auction block this Friday as the LaGrange County Habitat for Humanity holds its annual fundraising auction.
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KENDALLVILLE — The 2014 Northeast Indiana Light the Night walk official kick-off party is Thursday, Aug. 14, at 5 p.m. at Country Heritage Winery & Vineyard, 0185 C.R. 68, LaOtto.
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BUTLER — Two Noble County men face multiple charges after they were apprehended by the Butler Police Department Saturday.
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Top Stories from NewsChannel15

NEW YORK (AP) — Within minutes, the line at the food truck parked on a busy Queens thoroughfare extended several people deep. Hipster foodies looking to sample vegan pizzas or fusion tacos? Nope, these were children, agonizing over whether to pick the ham-and- cheese or the peanut butter-and-jelly sandwiches, the regular or chocolate milk. It was part of a summer meals program that tries to make sure the children who qualify for free or reduced-price meals during the academic year don’t lose out just because school’s out. Instead of the kids coming to where the food is, the food goes to where the...
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WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 35 percent of Americans have debts and unpaid bills that have been reported to collection agencies, according to a study released Tuesday by the Urban Institute. These consumers fall behind on credit cards or hospital bills. Their mortgages, auto loans or student debt pile up, unpaid. Even past-due gym membership fees or cellphone contracts can end up with a collection agency, potentially hurting credit scores and job prospects, said Caroline Ratcliffe, a senior fellow at the Washington-based think tank. “Roughly, every third person you pass on the street is going to have debt in collections,” Ratcliffe said....
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CHICAGO (AP) — The NCAA agreed Tuesday to settle a class-action head injury lawsuit by creating a $70 million fund to diagnose thousands of current and former college athletes to determine if they suffered brain trauma playing football, hockey, soccer and other contact sports. College sports’ governing body also agreed to implement a single return-to-play policy spelling out how all teams must treat players who received head blows, according to a Tuesday filing in U.S. District Court in Chicago. Critics have accused the NCAA of giving too much discretion to hundreds of individual schools about when athletes can go back into...
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WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite some good news, Medicare and Social Security still face long-term financial problems as millions of baby boomers reach retirement. Social Security’s disability program is already in crisis as it edges toward the brink of insolvency. Getting relief from a slowdown in health care spending, Medicare’s giant hospital trust fund won’t be exhausted until 2030, the government said Monday. That’s four years later than last year’s estimate. As for Social Security, its massive retirement program will remain solvent until 2034. The disability trust fund, however, is slated to run dry in just two years. At that point, unless Congress...
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NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. health officials are monitoring the Ebola outbreak in Africa but say the risk of the deadly germ spreading to the United States is remote. The Centers for Disease Control on Monday sent a health alert to U.S. doctors about the outbreak. There are no travel restrictions to the West Africa region hit by the disease. But last month, the CDC issued a mid-level travel advisory for health workers. Two American aid workers in Liberia have tested positive for the Ebola virus and are being treated there. The family of one worker — a doctor — recently returned...
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WASHINGTON (AP) — A $1,000-per-pill drug that insurers are reluctant to pay for has quickly become the treatment of choice for a liver-wasting viral disease that affects more than 3 million Americans. In less than six months, prescriptions for Sovaldi have eclipsed all other hepatitis C pills combined, according to new data from IMS Health. The prospect of a real cure, with fewer nasty side effects, is enticing thousands of patients to get treated for the first time. But clinical and commercial successes have triggered scrutiny for the drug’s manufacturer, California-based Gilead Sciences Inc., which just reported second-quarter profits of $3.66 billion,...
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